Friday, 26 May 2017

Locals learn the ropes in Gippsland hospitals

Nine students who grew up in Gippsland are among 94 first year students doing placements in hospitals across Gippsland during 2017. The students, all studying the graduate entry medicine course, spend their first year based in Churchill and their reasons for studying medicine are as varied as their postcodes.

Local learning: eight students who grew up in Gippsland are now studying medicine based in Churchill. L-R: Niharika Ojha, Melissa Bruerton, Olivia Ferretti, Holly Rennie, Tumi Yusuf, Stephanie Wall, Jacoba van Wees, Max McKenzie.

Tumi Yusuf’s father is a doctor working in Warragul where she grew up. “My dad was a doctor, so I thought that was pretty cool. But I got to the end of high school and started to rebel,” she said. “I thought, I don’t want to do what my dad does.” In the end she decided medicine did provide useful skills.

Others were influenced by personal experiences as they grew up.

Olivia Ferretti’s father was in a serious truck accident when she was ten years old, and spent four weeks in intensive care followed by another six or seven months rehabilitation in Melbourne. It was a long way from Bairnsdale where the family lived. “We were involved in his recovery and he’s still getting ongoing treatment now. I’ve been heavily involved with his treating team,” she remembered.

Melissa Bruerton was originally from Hazelwood North. Guidance from good teachers and how moved she was by the needs of people living in poverty when she travelled overseas led to her choice.

Some students started out on a career in medical research, but found they wanted a closer relationship with the people they were working to help. Max McKenzie of Sale wanted to give back to the community on a more personal basis. Jacoba van Wees, who’s lived all over Gippsland, came to the same conclusion. “I didn’t like how distant research felt from people. I wanted to have the opportunity to have direct impact even if it’s only in a small way.”

They are certainly discovering the personal side of medicine while on placement. Warragul locals, Holly Rennie and Tumi Yusuf, are both based at Warragul hospital. Running into people they know is common and, though they laugh about it, it’s a positive part of studying locally. “You just see everyone and I find it comforting,” said Tumi.

Stephanie Wall’s interest in medicine started when she found herself enjoying looking at the pictures in nursing textbooks as a kid. Like Holly and Tumi, she’s fond of her home town, Warragul, and the community there. “It’s really important to do what we can to keep that community together. I’d really like to be able to facilitate people staying in their community for help,” she said.

Holly also wants to stay rural. “There’s a need in rural areas that I could jump in and fill. That’s really attractive to me and giving back to the community as well. People wouldn’t have to travel all the way to Melbourne if I was a specialist there,” she mused.

Once they complete this year the students may stay in Gippsland, be placed in other parts of regional Victoria or go to Melbourne to finish their medical course. And while their path will take a couple more years to complete than if they’d stepped in straight from secondary school, they all agree that a first degree was excellent preparation for the medicine course and gives them something else to fall back on.

Niharika Ojha, who originally hailed from Traralgon, and Jacoba van Wees both said they felt more equipped to deal with the course then if they’d gone in straight from secondary school. Holly Rennie is quite sure her biomedical studies and a few years spent out of school will make her a better doctor. She started out studying education, then moved into biomedicine. “It was through that and working with the YMCA – which was really hands-on and helping people – that I decided I wanted to go into medicine. Coming into this after six years of working in the outside community, I know I have a whole different outlook on medicine.